Tips for joint custody in New York

On Behalf of | Jan 19, 2021 | Child Custody |

If you and your ex-spouse have gone through the divorce process and you have children together, the judge may have issued a joint custody order. Under this order, both of you are custodial parents who spend roughly equal amounts of time with the children and have equal say in decisions regarding them. Parents in the state of New York can make joint custody agreements a little easier by remembering some helpful hints.

Flexibility

In the official court order, the judge will actually designate which parent gets to spend time with the children on which days. It will be a very specific document designed to ensure that neither parent monopolizes time with the children. However, if you and your former partner remain amicable, the two of you can make adjustments to these child custody arrangements as you go along.

If there is a special event that your child wants to attend with your ex, consider being flexible regarding the normal schedule. Not only does this keep the needs of your children at the forefront, but it also keeps things cordial between the parents.

Not every hill is worth climbing

Choosing your battles after a divorce is an important aspect of building a new life for all concerned, especially the children. You and your former spouse ended your marriage for a reason, and no one expects you to agree on everything. Just remember that not every disagreement is worth having a major altercation over.

Decisions such as where the children will go to school, when they can start dating and what faith to raise them in may be worth standing your ground. Minor issues such as how many servings of vegetables your ex serves your child at dinner are minor in comparison.

Protecting your parental rights and your child’s best interests will require a great deal of sensitivity and willingness to work with your former spouse. If you believe your ex is violating the terms of your joint custody agreement, you should also work with an attorney who knows your state’s family law system.